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in our privacy series. we are looking at privacy issues and telecommunications policy. joining us from mount view, california, is yahoo!'s cheap of privacy, anne toth. also with us, juliana grunewald. thank you for being with us from california. what is your job at yahoo!? >> i am the vice president of global policy and the head of privacy at yahoo! that means i work with product teams, marketing, customer care, a work throughout the organization to make sure our policies and privacy promises are embedded throughout policies and products. >> this is what you had to say about yahoo!'s privacy policy. >> is this a new policy that yahoo! has developed, and is it one of the more stringent ones in your world? >> our policies have been in evolution over time. i think our thinking about privacy from the beginning. i have been a guy who for 12 years and i have worked with product people to make sure that privacy is reflected through our products services. that is absolutely nothing new. the way we have been thinking about privacy lately has been about how to contextualize privacy so that it ha
still with us? are you still with us? they were not sure -- these guys will tell you here, they were not sure who was what, where was where, in our situation. i would say -- i would not say they forgot about us, but there were times that we felt like we were forgotten about, because they blew us east of the airport, probably 60 miles before they turned us back -- flew us east of the airport, and all the time asking, are you still with us? it was just total mass confusion all over. >> i wanted to thank the four of you for your actions that day and what you continue to do for us. i question is for the commercial pilot. i was wondering how you decided to tell the passengers what was going on. did you consider lying to them? [laughter] a small bump in the aircraft, you know. >> that would be a hard-line to cover up. the best policy was just to be honest with them. they are all in a life-and-death situation, and had every right to know that. the moment that i knew that everyone's life was somewhat in danger and at risk, i let them know. i tell them, as far as i know, we are at work. >> i
settings to get rid of. we would oppose using those for marketing purposes. there might be reasons to use those technologies to deliver something to you like a movie or tv show or game or something that is more interactive, but that is different from collecting information and using it for marketing for offices, and we would oppose the use of persistent technologies for marketing purposes. >> you said that the baucher and stearns draft bill would have a dramatic effect on your industry. can you give more detail about what you do not like and what you do like about your bill? i know that privacy advocates do not think it goes nearly far enough, and it is true -- too industry-friendly. >> we would not describe the bill as industry-friendly. the kinds of things we do not like about it -- we think is much too broad and a lot of the definitions are very broad. there are things that i think everyone would agree have been defined many times over by other laws as personally identifiable useful information, like social security numbers, but there are other things considered personally of verifiabl
visit us whenever you can and your always ready to jump in whenever we need you. we could not have done this without you so we're honored to have you with us today. please welcome our governor, our partner and our friend. wed wa edward g. rendale. >> good morning. when richard and i first visited this site my first years governor i didn't know what a profound effect it would have on us. >> the pennsylvania legislature could not agree unanimously that today is saturday. [laughter] when flight 93 crossed into pennsylvania, the fight to defend and protect our country was already underway. it was a fight that would be one at great cost. the cost of 40 wonderful lives. from the moment that the plane hit the ground, the names of these pennsylvania and became indelibly etched into the history of the commonwealth of pennsylvania. along with benjamin franklin, who committed treason and risked his life to give birth to this new nation. all along with general george marshall of uniontown, who helped to lead the allied war effort in world war ii, and his secretary of state help to rebuild our alli
. it was stitched together by dozens of americans who simply wanted those of us who survived the attack on his building to note that day, our fellow citizens, would always remember those who did not. on that quilt are written these words by a little girl, "in our hearts, we weep for you. in our minds, we honor you." today, her words still comfort us, because today, we still weak for those we lost here and in new york -- weep for those we lost here, in new york, and in somerset county. we honor them with our presence and certainly with this memorial. mostly, we honor them with our lives, with what we have done from that day to this, the sacrifices we have borne, the laughter we have shared, the hope we have dared to let back into our hearts. unspeakable carnage was visited upon us here, but it did not conquer us. unimaginable loss was felled by a us here, but it does not diminish -- felt by us here, but it does not diminish us. what lies behind you and what lies in front of you pales in comparison to what lies inside of you. let us weep for what lies behind us. let us honor what lies in front o
part about jobs, and it is about making us more energy sustainable, but also it is about people. one of the things is how can we convince the american people of what we want to do? i do not have the answer. i just have an idea. >> thank you so much. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> in his weekly address, president obama observed the ninth anniversary of the september 11th terrorist attacks, paying tribute to the victims that day and the sacrifices of our troops abroad. the minority whip also mark september 11th and discussed the ongoing military response to those attacks. this is 10 minutes. >> today, we mark a day in our history. we will never forget the anger and the sadness that we felt. while nine years have come and gone since that september morning, the passage of time it will never diminish the pain and loss forever seared into the consciousness of our nation. that is why on this day, we pray with the families of those who died. we mourn with the husbands and wives, children and paren
the next afghanistan, a failed state. we have also seen an increased response from the u.s. government, which has made counter-terrorism one of the pits of its engagement with yemen and one of the central elements of its overall policy with yemen more broadly. whether counter-terrorism should be the pivot of u.s. policy in yemen and if it is, what kind of counter-terrorism policy is most appropriate? the country faces an extraordinary range of challenges and where by all accounts -- by many accounts, the number of al qaeda in the country remained relatively low art very important questions for u.s. policy-makers. the reason why the yemen working group at the u.s. institute of peace, which i direct, decided to focus our session this morning on the question of counter-terrorism in u.s. policy in yemen and as a component of u.s. policy more broadly toward yemen. i can literally think of no one more qualified to address the subject of counter-terrorism in yemen that our speaker today, ambassador daniel benjamin, the state department's coordinator for counter-terrorism. counter-terrorism is
about the rest of us? and there is a lot bween ron paul and dennis kucinich. what about the rest of us? my view is that i do not want to be involved in endless wars anymore thanhey do, but i do insist that we win wars we cannot afford to lose. now, the left and some of our libertarian friends believe we cannot afford this war and they e ready to leave. what happens if we leave and does it really matter? all of you are smart. you can aner that question probably better than i can. i can tell you what i think and that is probably why you came. if we lose i afghanistan, whatever that may be, it will matter. and what is losing? i think losing would be allowing the taliban to come back in power in portions or all of the country. i have one simple thought -- the taliban running anything is not a good idea. particularly i you happen to be a young woman and you believe in religious freedom and tolerance. but what does it really matter? their places -- there are places on the planet where women are treated horribly and we do not have one troop. so this is not just about righting wrongs that may
working on it very hard ever since then. this is very important to us. >> the tech daily dose editor for the national journal joins us. >> i am told that you're going to be putting out some guidelines in of the fall. could you tell us what they will do, whom they are aimed at, and more specifically, when they might come out? >> these will not be guidelines in terms of being final thinking on these issues. we will release some draft documents to try to figure out where there are points of consensus and agreement. what we are hoping to do is increase transparency. one of the concerns is that most people do not know they are being tracked. second, come up with clear, meaningful ways for consumers to exercise control and choice. third, identify areas that are most critically important, sensitive and affirmation, and uses of the information beyond online behavioral advertising that we have seen already. those are some of the key issues that we are going to address in the guidance that we put out. >> in your testimony on july 22nd you said this, if legislation is enacted, the commission be
angeles daily news." that is all for the program, thank you for joining us. we will now go to the senate homeland security and government affairs committee where chairman lieberman is going to be hosting a meeting about the ongoing threats. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . >> i was struck yesterday by reading a gallup poll in one of the newspapers that showed a significant decrease in concern about terrorism among the american people. now, this is understandable, particularly because of the stress that current economic conditions have put so many american families under, but as the three witnesses know very well, the threat is still all too real. our committee knows that as well. it's our job and yours to be focused on protecting our homeland and our people from violent extremist and terrorists no matter what the state of public opinion is about it at the moment, and that's why, of course, we are so happy that -- and grateful that you are here today. the tragedy of 9/11 is a daily reality for the three of y
then anthony placido of the dea on u.s. drug enforcement and intelligence gathering. from the nation's capital, this is "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> over the last two years that has meant taking on powerful interests. powerful interests who have been dominating the agenda in washington for a very long time but they are not always happy with me. they talk about me like a dog. [applause] that is not in my prepared remarks -- but it is true. remarks -- but it is true. host: president obama kicking off the midterm elections with his remarks, prepared an otherwise yesterday in milwaukee, a state that he won in 2008 and where a number of key congressional races are shaping up. it is back to work today following the labor day weekend. the president is in washington. congress returns next week. some of the headlines this september 7. "the new york times" -- once a dynamo, they tech sector slow to hire. and tomorrow obama to push tax breaks for businesses. and the business s
in the investigation and recovery efforts are with us in the audience today. for the first responders, around -- a round of applause. [applause] this is also the place where the media gave the nation and the world their first glimpse of the crash site. this is the place where a community in nation came together, the red cross and salvation army and good samaritans demonstrated great compassion and care here. local residents of this community and county opened their home andeart to the families and to the nation. a small memorial of pay bills was placed at the overlook where families could leave -- of hay bales was placed at the overlook where families could leave flowers and other items. still adding we're to that simple memorial. the nation in the world have joined the salute. you will hear from distinguished speakers today. i want to impart with you the confidence that the department of the interior, in our capacity as to words of national parks and historic sites for our great nation, is committed to building this memorl. because of the work here, we're on our way, with the friends and fam
in the united states -- which is part of what's going to keep us growing and keep us innovative -t companies are strongly incentivized to do that. making sure that their expensing accelerated business depreciation is happening in 2011, so that if companies are sort of sitting on the sidelines right now, not sure whether they should invest, let's give them incentive to go ahead and invest now to give that a jumpstart. on infrastructure, we've got a highway bill that traditionally is done every six years. and what we're saying is let's ramp up what we're doing, let's beef it up a little bit -- because we've got this infrastructure all across the country that everybody from governors to mayors to economists to engineers of all political stripes have said is holding us back in terms of our long-term competitiveness -- let's get started now rebuilding america. and in terms of paying for some of these things, let's stop giving tax breaks to companies that are shipping jobs overseas, let's stop incentivizing that. let's give tax breaks to companies that are investing right here in the united states
tax cuts and the expiration possibilities, obama and the democrats like to use the $250,000 figure. that is insane they will not raise taxes on the middle class. republicans -- that is saying they will not raising region be raising taxes on the middle class. republicans may find it expedient to allow them to expire so they can point fingers at the democrats during an election year. is it possible you may want to accept the $250,000 level rather than risk that all the tax cuts would expire? >> our opposition has always been pretty firm, and that we support an extension of all the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts. we believe in an economy as weak as the one we are living in right now that raising taxes on any individuals, and certainly on individuals that spend significant amounts of money as well as businesses that are successful and in a greater position to hire and expand output, we believe that is not something that should be done. when it gets into which ones we would or would not accept, i am not going to sit here and negotiate with myself and public saying we will open the bidding at a
at the convergence of 50 research reports that talked about the dangers of cell phone use in testinand texting devicee driving. there was so little understanding about this. we had a massive debate. we knew this was very danger is behavior based on the research. we come from at traffic safety perspective, and we know the way to change this behavior follows the formula you heard ray lahood talk about. how you do that in the framework of very little conversation was the difficult part. a year ago on january we call for a nationwide ban on told a news and text to use while driving, and we called for companies to put in place policies prohibit the use of this. it was such a long debate press because of the lack of conversation. then i look at today and what we heard from secretary lahood and others. but that the amount of activity we have heard from a state legislative point of view, a research point of view, law enforcement point of view. i encourage you as we listen to our panelists today to think about how we maintain the momentum. i think all of us know that a year of action, even a tremendou
today to explain to us a little bit more about how the pipeline system works, with the infrastructure challenges and how people can get more materials their area from the government, we appreciate your information. guest: thank you, susan. host: we're going to close out today by telling you what's coming up next on c-span. you're going to join in progress the family research council on their annual meeting. it's called the 2010 values voter summit. it's taking place at the regency ballroom here in washington, d.c. it started at 8:45 this morning, so they're underway. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . our strength and have the vision for what works in our country. think about a culture that does not have the values, the restraint of being accountable to god. we see it all over the world. where the economy works with corruption and work politicians are corrupt. the cost of the people that have no values and morals. then you need a bigger government to control a violent and disruptive people. there is a corr
of the government, the current effort in afghanistan and condition of the u.s. economy, all referenced in the president's speech. here is how you can talk to us the first half hour. president obama saying last night it is time to turn the page. your interpretation of that. phone, e-mail, or twitter. again, if you want to give an e- mail, journal@c-span.org and twitter, go to twitter and then c-spanwj. "the washington post" use is that " for its story tonight. turning to "the new york times." and going to "usa today" -- again, the president quote. conn. mary on hours democrats line. caller: good morning, pedro. i wanted to say how proud i am of president obama fulfilling another of his campaign commitments. i wish to the iraqi people well in governing themselves. and i agree with the president that it is time that we concentrates on our economy and what happened to the people in the middle class. i hope he does stand strong on inundating -- eliminating the tax credit that was given to the very wealthy, by discontinuing that at the end of the year. host: raleigh, north carolina. john, re
of terrorism will not stand. he used the phrase, "will not stand." i turned to my colleague from the pentagon and said that was exactly what the president's father said when saddam hussein invaded kuwait. he was not famous for coining phrases. he made one or two. "no new taxes" was one of them. [laughter] i remember his extremely strong and and characteristic statement that the invasion of kuwait would not stand. a said to myself it was a remarkable coincidence the president would use precisely that phrase. it was a phrase that connoted war. i still did not confirm anything to the press. the president's statement made it clear that something terrible had happened in new york. what happened then was my team spent the evening -- it is a typical thing in useful for journalists to know this. when something like this happens, a major event happens, very often you will get more current information from watching television and listening to the press and you will from the intelligence services. the reason for that is that there are more journalists. they are all over the place. we spent the evening a
with the till look -- tillamook burn. never. we used to have a very high rate of employment, with a relatively high average, annual salary when the mills were operating. we no longer have mills. what in the hell are we doign to this -- doing to this state? >> do you want to share any thoughts on the east side forest plan my colleague has been trying to put together to get out of this deadlock? >> it all works soemtimes. -- sometimes. but every time that something gets going, it goes to the courts. we are stymied. >> thank you very much. whenever i am hiding in that area, you often see -- hiking in that area, you often see completely overgrown, second- growth forests that are not serving their purpose and are often a source of disease, a potential fire hazard. it is a lose-lose-lose situation. there are a number of things that we need to push forward on. one is the thinning which produces a steady supply of logs, better timber stands, and improves the ecosystem. nothing moves past in this world, but another piece was -- senator wyden and i thought to get money to help for us to thinning. a seco
this together on such short notice. for those of us who are jews, , some jewish we know what it is like when people have attacked us verbally, attacked us physically and others remained silent. it tcjhhn>'n, americaw"# in 2010 without the response of the religious community. we speak out because we know that hate crimes and hate speech are not mere acts of disreputableiv! assaults or arsons or derivative their attacks on the pillars of the public and the guarantors of our freedom. betrayalo >> what an honor and privilege is for me having stood on the mall for years ago under similar circumstances where we were talking about liberty and justice for all. the statement that we have worked together collectively reads the sleeve. religious leaders denounced anti- muslim bigotry, call for america's respect for tradition a religious liberty. as religious leaders in this great country we have come together in our nation's capital to denounce categorically the derision, misinformation, and outright bigotry being directed against america's muslim community. we bear a sacred responsibility to honor ame
. this is a reaction to what another country is doing to us. china is restraining its currency unilaterally. i wish they were not. i wish they were allowing their currencies to more liberally fluctuate with its true accommodating value. but if they can act unilaterally to hold down their currency, to make their goods seem more expensive for us to purchase, then we have the right to act in our best interests, whether it is unilateral or not, to respond. that way we can give our workers and businesses a fair chance to compete. i did not know if i can ask you a question, mr. secretary, it because you have done remarkably good job of trying to explain how important this relationship with china is. i believe you're trying to speak not just to us and the american people but to the chinese as well. i hope that some of us are able to speak to you and to communicate to the chinese people and government to say that this is not about trying to get on the case of the chinese. we have seen this picture before. we did it over a century ago. people are wondering where we came from when we became number one. i thi
to deal, even with current law, one is to make sure that we can use our accountability law and our anti-dumping law, and our import safety laws to make sure they are protected from both on fair trade practices and surges from china in imports. we are losing -- we are using those laws very effectively. we have a right, under the wto, secondly, to make sure that when china is doing something else in china that limits our excess or unfairly discriminates, we can take them to the wto and get them to stop those practices. we're using the very effectively. we have a long way to go. we are having an portent debate , region and partisan debate, not about the object -- and the important debate, not about the objective, but what additional sets of tools we can use. many of these practices have more adverse effects on other trading partners. we will try to use all those tools, and work with you and your colleagues to see if we can find better approaches. >> i appreciate your answers, and i encourage you to look at the currency reform for their trade act. with that, i will yield to the chairman. >>
advertising market suffered -- they're coming back strongly now -- that was not an issue for us. the subscription model continues to work extremely well for us. we also think that, as you look at other screens, the subscription model travels very well. you suddenly hear other entities talking about subscription models. we have been in the business for a long time. all of a sudden, syndication has become a buzzword. cable companies are going to authenticate the fact that you are a subscriber, which allows you to watch the content to get to that cable system on your ipod or your laptop or whatever device. we kind of giggle at that. previously, we have been syndicated. if you ordered showtime back in 1978, there was a filter remove from the cable drop which would allow the showtime to pass through the ocax -- coax into your home. we think our judgment of what is happening is far easier than it would be for others. >> what is your model? >> you may pay your cable operator and get your credit everywhere. as all of the technologies come along, what is our rate structure, what are we g
for being with us on this friday. let's tell you what we're doing next. we will take you to the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c. and the panel session that looks at what we have learned nine years after the 9/11 attacks. there is an evolving terrorist threat and there will be several speakers. live coverage begins shortly. thank you for being with us on this friday morning and we will see to morning -- tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. on "washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >> we are leave at this national press club this morning where former 9/11 commission lee hamilton and tom cane will speak with reporters about how terrorist threats have changed since 9/11. the two are now co-chairs of the national security preparedness group of the bipartisan policy center. it's an organization founded three years ago by former senate majority leader tom daschle. bob dole, georg
will take a short break for lunch and at 1:30 p.m., we reconvened with panel 3 on the use of dispersants with three panelists. add to 30 5:00 p.m., panel four will focus on the future of onshore drilling, and we will have three panelists there. at 335 pm, panel 5 lil 0 -- focus on the response in the arctic. we will have five panelists. after a short break, we convene at 5:00 p.m. to begin the public comment period, and at 5:30 p.m., we will adjourn. any member of the public would like to submit a comment made do so via the web site at oilspillcommission.gov. we have a full agenda and we respect everyone's time. we asked all the panelists to please stay within the time limits in order to allow ample time for the commissioners to ask questions. there is a timekeeper right here in front who will monitor the time. we ask the panelists to please begin to summarize their remarks when they reach the timekeeper's one minute mark. i give control of the meeting to our cochairs, senator bob graham and the honorable william reilly. >> thank you. winston churchill described in event as not being the
'll be back at 7:00 eastern time, thank you for joining us. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] >>. what's in 2007, analysts meredith whitney was the first to predict major losses for citigroup. she said -- our guest tonight on c-span's q&a. >> next, a discussion on the image of muslims in the u.s.. some of the topics are the controversy over the proposed islamic center near ground zero in york city. it is an hour and half. >> we welcome you to our briefing. and we have a distinguished panel year before you to talk about -- we call it a discussion. i want to be clear that this briefing is not about park 51. none of the panelists here are experts on the project or connected directly. this is not about park 51. the congressional muslim the staff association does not necessarily endorse the positions of the panelists here. we want to bring together experts and community leaders to talk about conversations in the wake of this controversy that is taking place all across america. it is a complex conversation that we're having right now. the muslim staff association represents a
not be a barrier to an enlightened future. those of us privileged to serve society as a selective representatives -- as its elected representatives are rise to be reminded of the relationship between church and state. we are conscious of a healthy tension in this relationship as we seek to do our business. your presence, most holy father, adds to the rich tapestry of the past, and provides further reason for the many hundreds of thousands of people who come here every year to contemplate the character of this building and what has been witnessed in it. faith is not a relic either in political discourse or in modern society. it is embedded in its fabric. warned of the greeting extended by her majesty yesterday to the of the greeting extended by her majesty as today to the holy father was noticeable. many elected members of parliament, members of the house of lords, and numerous others this -- numerous other distinguished guests, on behalf of everyone here, i warmly welcome you and invite you to address us. [applause] >> mr. speaker, thank you for your words of welcome on behalf of this distinguish
the radical philosophies that have been used to fight geps these acts. my goal here is two fold. first, to reach out to my brothers and sisters of different faiths to sxhan and share my love of my religion and second to reach out to my muslim brothers and sisters around the world to explain my love of america. allow me to begin by telling you my story. i came america by boat when i was 17 years old. we sailed into new york harbor on a sunny and cold winter day in 1965, three days before christmas. i remember seeing the stat u of liberty for the first time. i remember admiring her colors >> i was born in dwat to egyptian parents. my father was a religious father. he was active promoting understanding between different religions. coming from a country that was mostly muslim, i found this country without religion, even anti-religious. in the 1960's, religion was found to be passe even a crutch for the simple minded. this was shocking to me, extraordinary. i thought this place sure is different. i received my bachelor's degree, married and held several different jobs. i am a normal america
. he thought for us every day. he set the standard for public service. >> and so today, my friends, my campaign for alaska's future begins. [applause] i got it. ok. i get the message, all right. i get the message. i hear it loud and clear. and i announce today that i will be a write-in candidate in november for the united states senate seat that i now hold. we're in this together. thank you. i thank you for this support and this confidence. i will tell you that when those votes came in on the 24th of august, when they were counted, there was nobody that was more disappointed than i was. but since then, things have happened, events have transpired, and there has been an outpouring of support from alaskans all over the state, from all spectrums, from all political persuasions. when i sat down at a restaurant and the waiter says, lisa, run and i will quit my job and i will come to work for you. i think he actually said he would go part-time. but this is the outpouring of support that i have received from individuals stopping me in the airport, to the diners, received on the email. it has
approach looking at the entire case and come up with some recommendations. >> could you give us a couple of areas that you see -- you are watching all this unfold -- that you think needs to change? >> first of all, having an uncontrolled spill at 5,000 feet below water was something that was new to us. most of our plans were developed for dealing with finite spills. you have a ship with a certain capacity. if it strikes a rock, there is a maximum amount of oil that will be discharged from that ship or a shore facility. you can supply the proper amount of equipment for that. we had something that was happening day after day. it was groundhog day force. everything seemed to be the same, except for when the weather and the kurds were different each day, pushing the oil in different directions. we had to be reactive to that. i think we learned a lot from that. it is difficult for a lot of people who are not familiar with the maritime environment where things are dynamic. they change from day to day. you have to have adaptable forces. that is one of the views about the fold -- the postcard. -
again. that saving that they are doing is going to help us in the future as we reinvest and stabilize and grow out of this. host: you do get more information logging onto nsba.b is -- jeff from florida. good morning. caller: i have a questn and a concern. theatriot long for veterans. wondering if there is any activity for met -- patriot loan. guest: in terms of? caller: loaning down to usf veterans. host: you need to start business? caller: to gain some monetary to help us of parrot guest: as i am sure you know, there are a number of programs through the re sba to help veterans. senator kerry is to be chairman of the commanding, and was a lead in veterans business issues and did put together that bill. i have to go back and see where things stand with passage right now. but we certainly have been supportive of efforts to get more cash into the hands of both the veterans businesses and all small businesses. host: upstate, new york -- upstate new york, binghamton. caller: i just wanted to say that i am amazed at the ignorance of this administration. you are postulating now that small bu
%. if i may proud independence. -- i'm a proud independent. if you look at our infrastructure, who uses mass transit more -- middle class, lower class, or upper class? i would say is middle or lower. guest: certainly, it depends on where you are. the certainly, the average bus- writer in america has a slightly lower income -- the average bus rider in america has a slightly lower income than the average american household. however, the express between fort worth and dallas, for example, it tends to be middle and upper income the use that. across america, all strata of society use public transportation and depending on where the transit goes and what type of transit it is combined with the market is that they are seeking to reach, it could be of -- it could be either very high income, that is with the commuter rail lines in new york or chicago or san francisco are an example of. it can be no american income americans going back and forth -- it can be middle-class american income going back and forth to work. it is a wide spectrum of people that use public transit. when i give these statis
what it's doing in the back of a box. and sometimes that's what really catches us unawares. so there is a shared responsibility between those of us now and the new generation coming. the new generation of pilots will likely have been participants in virtual reality activities. through the form of video and computer games and an interesting statistic for those who are not aware of it, we have these massively multiplayer online games. . >> the box itself, there are good advantage and good things about how it is continuing to be developed. this picture up there is actually a picture from the bowing 787 simulator. the simulators have been progressing, they are going to continue to do so, and the gap between the sim and real world is more blurred. this is not a bad thing. it can be a good thing. the biggest point is it is a reality, whether we like it or not. let's tap into the strength of as we great greater fidelity, that should be leveraged to its maximum possible ability. reaction skills are really key, and they're very good. this tool does well at that. you can get the necessar
that is. [applause] >> thank you for sharing your experience with us. diane? >> thank you and thank you all for coming. i want to tell you about my journey of how i came to be a volunteer. in my professional career, i started off as an elementary school teacher. after a couple of years, i went on that 30 years of government service, in social security and this agency. the height of my professional career was working with singers, educating them on what benefits they were entitled to, or helping them to resolve an issue with social security or medicare. during my years with this agency, i also worked in many activities that are classified as anti-fraud activities. once i was hired and looking for something to do was a volunteer, i found that the work of the senior medicare patrol would allow me to continue that which i enjoyed the most -- working with singers and fighting fraud in health care. seniors are concerned about what happens in health care. it is one of the most critical aspects in their lives. it is their main social activity when they go to the doctor. they listen to all the a
police procedures and what not that would be used in any crime scene were used in connection with this event. mike does mention the excellent work that the fbi did piecing together the puzzle that led to the identification of the terrorists within a short period of time. however, the preventive side of it definitely became more of a military exercise. even in that regard, the fbi and department of justice had central roles to play to develop a strategy that could be implemented to look at our borders. >> there had been a number of terrorist attacks. there were the embassies in east africa. the first world trade center attack. you could even go back to the u.s. marine barracks bombing in beirut in 1983. in every case with the united states government did principally was to send out the fbi to try to find people you could identify as perpetrators so that they could be captured and prosecuted. what you hear from all of the discussion and is very important for people to focus on is that this was a different case. this was not about going out to find people who did it to punish th
." join us with your calls, e- mail's end tweets next sunday at noon eastern on c-span3 book tv. >> now, the washington institute for near east policy post a discussion on leadership of the oilseeds of saddam hussein. documents were captured in iraq in 2003 and provided scholars with an inside view of the iraqi regime _ sought -- saddam hussein's leadership. they have archived the materials. this is about 1.5 hours. >> good afternoon ladies and gentleman. my name is michael eisenstaedt. i am a senior fellow and director of the studies program at the washington institute of near east policy. almost three years to the day this week marks the start of the iraq war. it led to a series of events in a bloody eight year war between iran and iraq which contributed to the 1991 gulf war which in turn set up a decade of sanctions and containment of iraq followed by the 2003 invasion of iraq by the united states and its coalition partners which leads us to where we are today. one of the consequences of the invasion of iraq was that the united states government's possession of massive numbers of gov
cleared, the loss was actually greater. all of us can remember where we were, what we were doing, and how we felt as the news of the attacks was broadcast over all of the news networks. most of us had the opportunity to experience those attacks through our televisions, most in the privacy of our own homes, where we were able to take in and process, and grieve over what was occurring. the people that we will be talking with today did not have that luxury of learning about the events on their televisions. these were the individuals that were on the front lines that day. they were the men and women who could not watch it on tv, but had to respond. they had to act. they had no time to grieve. they had no time to plan. they had no time to prepare. we had not prepared for what happened that day. they were called upon to improvise. their actions and their decisions could either cost lives or save lives. for me, as an airline pilot, the was not flying that day, i had a burning desire to understand what it was like for these people that were in the air traffic control facility, and the cockpit, an
that were donated to us. these were original patents that were provided. some of them date back to the early 1800's. is a reminder of what makes this country so great, our inventiveness. are originally there were a bunch of plates up there and i decided i have the whole plate room so i don't need another one year. >> do you have but george washington year? >> i kept george washington, i have a brown blanket. this was donated by steven spielberg to the -- i have abraham lincoln. this was donated by steven spielberg to a bill clinton. it is by norman rockwell. you have these guys cleaning the torch. it is a reminder that we constantly have to renew the flames of our democracy. >> when people come in this room, how do you notice them react? >> well, you know, somebody said this is the greatest home court advantage you have in this office. i think people feel a certain reverence for this space, because it symbolizes the presidency and it symbolizes what has been extraordinary record of tough tough decision -- of tough decisions and monumental decisions made in this room. usually people have a bi
street especially as we head into the november reelection. also joining us, reid wilson will look at candidates supported by the party and their success rate. our last segment, brian powell looking at the definition of a family and the acceptance of same-sex couples and unmarried couples as a definition of family. that will be tomorrow on "washington journal" plus your phone calls and a look at the papers. it starts at 7:00 a.m. we will see you then. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . >> and after that, a confirmation hearing for jacob lew, president obama's choice to head the white house budget office. >> the conflict between the first amendment and national security "necessary secrets" author, this weekend on book tv. >> every weekend on c-span3, experience american history tv, 48 hours of people and events, telling the american story. hear historic speeches by national leaders and eyewitness accounts of events that shaped our nation. visit museums, historical sites and college campuses as professors
. his goal was to work until he was 80. from the two of us putting down the river, i said, [laughter] my brother, john and i had a rare privilege coming up. it we followed our father to the citadel and john is a graduate of the citadel mighting 79 and myself of 1980. he went on to the dental corps as a dentist. we transferred to the jag cora and i have been on active duty several times. my status as a veteran has been extremely helpful in my committee assignments to serve you and the nation in congress. it is really unfortunate that there are not as many veterans that serve in congress today. there are probably less than 20 of us that have served in a theatre of war and is pretty stunning. not long ago, i was able to say to john dingell that i do in the in that if god had given me the choice in military or congress, i would have chosen to serve in the congress where members have served in world war ii and korea. they understood the american character. they understood a character that was formed and forced out of the course also very difficult times, and they were task through time to act
, everyone, this tuesday morning. today on "washington journal," we want to get your thoughts on the right u.s. education system, the problems and solutions. president obama yesterday talking about the issue, saying we need to add one month to the school year, citing competitive nest for the united states. also, you have seen it on msnbc, and democratic candidates are talking about the issue as well. so it is your turn this morning to weigh in. what of the problems and solutions? all numbers are on your screen right there. we will get to your calls in just a minute. and remember, you can send us a or an e-mail. let me show you this headline. "new york daily news." let's add a month to the school year. year. the president backs and longer school year. then also the front page of the story, the president saying the d.c. public schools don't add up to private education. that is from the present yesterday as well. then there is a "the washington post" this morning with the headline. democratic candidates blast the gop over education policies, in search of a rallying issue. it looks like candidates
, is the u.s. still making any use of military bases and oman as in the past? >> i think we have military cooperation with oman, as we do with many countries, but i will defer the specifics to the pentagon. >> do you have any comment on the new japanese foreign minister? will the secretary have a bilateral meeting with him next week? >> we appreciated his many contributions to the u.s.-japan alliance and his role as foreign minister and we look for to working with him in his new capacity as general secretary of the dpj, and we will continue to work closely with the government of japan and the foreign minister across a broad range of issues between our nations. i am confident there will be high level meetings with japan coming up next week, but i will defer it to announcements that others will make on specifics of the bilaterals. >> we were just told before you got up here you would be making the announcement. >> no, no, there are some meetings the secretary will have, some that the president will have. >> can you go through the secretary's meetings as they are scheduled? >> we are relucta
recent recession that demonstrates the u.s. is very strong in its reaction to the cheonan incident. they joined at the very beginning in the rescue operations, and also, [unintelligible] -- the were in strong support of the u.s. administration. this is the largest area ever conducted in the caribbean peninsula. -- kirby and peninsula. i might say that this is the reincarnation of the incident that happened between 1977 and 1993. it was a deterrent to north korean leadership and rain that in north korean policies -- north korean policies. one side effect of this is china's reaction. when we conducted this exercise in the wake of the cheonan sinking, the chinese reaction was unusually harsh. i think it has awakened at the international community. it is central in the war, as reflected in the sense of china. china had some objection to this joint exercise. for example, july 15 -- "we formally oppose any foreign militaries placed in the yellow city, undermining china's security." and second also, this was a joint week emphasized by a high- ranking military -- this was a jointly emphasi
the u.s. has blundrd into the scenario with one overreaction or another. bin laden needs to be the object of our hoss tilts, national security and contempt and deserves to be taken seriously. but most of what he has achieved we do ourselves. bin laden does not deserve that we even inadvertently fuffleful unimagined dreams. here's more from the president friday at this news conference. i think in this day and age there is always going to be the potential for an individual or a small group of individuals, if they are willing to die, to kill other people. some of them are going to be very well organized and some of them are going to be random. that threat is there and it's important, i think, for the american people to understand that and not to live in fear. it's just a reality of today's world that there are going to be threats out there. we have i think greatly improved our homeland security security since 9/11 occurred. you know, i am constantly impressed with the dedication that our teams apply to this problem. they are chasing down every threat, not just from al qaeda
he will embrace the notion and he his republic c >> the u.s. senate returned from their summer break. the nomination is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. eastern. the chamber returns to work and small-business lending bill that has been stalled since midsummer. follow the senate live on c-span 2. and the house returns from its summer recess tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern for legislative business. they will take up a handful of bills under suspension of the rules. those are scheduled for 6:00 p.m. eastern. tomorrow, members will take a resolution honoring the ninth anniversary of 9/11. on wednesday, they will work on a couple of measures designed to boost domestic manufacturing and a bill dealing with energy efficiency programs for rural areas. watch live house covered starting tuesday at 2:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> with the house and senate back in session, followed congress using the cspan video library congressional chronicle. beginning cadets a complete -- you can index a complete list of congressional members. it is free any time. watch you what you want, when you want. >> the people who
college graduates by 2020. we used to be number one. we are now no. 12. we are going to get back to no. 1 by the end of the decade. that is why we're revitalizing community colleges and reforming our education system based on what works, not is -- not on what is status quo. that is why we're fighting to make permanent our new tax credit. that will mean $10 million for tuition relief for each child going to -- $10,000 for tuition relief for each child going to college. we see an america where the middle class is the bleeding heart of the economy. that is why we passed health insurance reform to stop insurance companies from jacking up your premium, then drop coverage when you are sick or have a pre-existing condition. that is why we passed financial reform, to end taxpayer bailouts. to stop on wall street banks from taking advantage of the people. we want to compete on service, on good products and good prices. that is why we are trying to make it easier for workers to pay for retirement and fighting efforts by some parties for social security, because the phone if i am president, no one i
probably knows more about these issues than many of us combined. he will be joining us. >> the aclu and the drug policy alliance are advocating for federal legislative change. my coalition co-chair will be talking about litigation and state reforms. i am going to focus on the federal and legislative response, some of the history, and details about what i am talking about today. the aclu were some federal disenfranchisement from three angles. we litigate in court, will lobby in federal and state legislatures, and we engage in public education. as we face another important election, there are an estimated 5.3 million americans who will not be able to vote because of the result of criminal convictions. this is despite the fact that the supreme court repeatedly has said that voting is a fundamental right. most with criminal convictions are barred from the polls. 48 out of 50 states have laws that bar citizens with criminal convictions from bidding in some manner. two other states permanently in franchise criminals with felony convictions. there are 5.3 million americans who cannot vote.
has the impact been on the scientists now using n.i.h. funding for embryonic stem cell research in terms of the uncertainty of the future? number two, what results have been taken in a positive sense, which i know are very good for the more than $500 million already expended? and what has been the consequence of the $10 million in the stimulus package where you informally told me that it has created the tremendous excitement and a new wave of enthusiasm by researchers who had been discouraged by the failure of congress to keep the pace, which we have moved from $12 billion to $30 billion, but failure to keep the pace in funding since 2003? >> senator, thank you for the question. and let me first say how appreciative i am personally and everyone at n.i.h. is for the strong leadership you have shown over these years in your advocacy for the value of medical research, and especially because we're talking about it today for stem cell research, that has been much appreciated, and your articulation of the importance has always been right on target, as it just was here in your opening
and a turbulent president need not be a barrier to an enlightened future. history means that those of us privileged to serve society as elected representatives arrived in this palace of westminster to be immediately reminded of the relationship between church and state. we are conscious of the tension in this relationship as we attempt to do our business. your presence, holy father, adds to the rich tapestry of the past and provides relief to the many people who come here every year to contemplate the character of this building and at what has been witnessed in it. faith is not a relic either in political discourse or in modern society, but is embedded in its fabric. the warm greeting extended to the holy father was a miracle indeed. today in this all, which sits in our democratic tradition, are gathered members of parliament, members of the house of lords, and numerous other distinguished guests from all walks of life and all paths of the united kingdom. on behalf of everyone here, i warmly welcome you and invite you to address us. [applause] >> mr. speaker, thank you for your welcome.
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